Refining

Western United States and Asia Refining as of Dec. 31, 2011   

The Ferndale Refinery is located on Puget Sound in Ferndale, Wash., about 20 miles south of the U.S.-Canada border. The refinery processes primarily light, Alaska North Slope crude oil.

Ferndale operates a deepwater dock capable of accommodating tankers transporting Alaskan North Slope crude oil from Valdez, Alaska. It also receives Canadian crude oil via pipeline. Ferndale Refinery facilities include a fluid catalytic cracker, an alkylation unit, hydrotreating units and a naphtha reformer. The refinery primarily produces transportation fuels, such as gasoline and diesel fuel. Other products include fuel oil supplying the northwest marine transportation market. Most refined products are distributed by pipeline and barge to major markets in the northwest United States.

The Los Angeles Refinery is composed of two linked facilities located roughly five miles apart in Carson and Wilmington, Calif., about 15 miles southeast of Los Angeles International Airport. Carson serves as the front end of the refinery by processing crude oil, and Wilmington serves as the back end by upgrading the intermediate products to finished products.

The refinery processes mainly heavy, high-sulfur crude oil. It receives domestic crude oil via pipeline from California and both foreign and domestic crude oil by tanker through a thirdparty terminal in the Port of Long Beach. The refinery produces a high percentage of transportation fuels, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. Other products include fuelgrade petroleum coke.

Its facilities include fluid catalytic cracking, alkylation, hydrocracking, coking and reforming units. The refinery produces California Air Resources Board (CARB)-grade gasoline using ethanol to meet government-mandated oxygenate requirements. Refined products are distributed to customers in California, Nevada and Arizona by pipeline and truck.

 

The San Francisco Refinery is comprised of two facilities linked by a 200-mile pipeline. The Santa Maria facility is located in Arroyo Grande, Calif., while the Rodeo facility is in the San Francisco Bay Area.

The refinery processes mainly heavy, highsulfur crude oil. It receives California crude oil via pipeline and both domestic and foreign crude oil by tanker. Semi-refined products from the Santa Maria facility are sent by pipeline to the Rodeo facility for upgrading into finished petroleum products. A high proportion of the refinery’s production is transportation fuel, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel.

Process facilities include coking, hydrocracking, hydrotreating and reforming units. The refinery produces CARB-grade gasoline using ethanol to meet government-mandated oxygenate requirements. The majority of refined products are distributed by pipeline, railcar and barge to customers in California.

 Visit the San Francisco Refinery web site here.

The PSR-2 refinery in Melaka, Malaysia, is a joint venture with Petronas, the Malaysian state oil company. Phillips 66 owns a 47 percent interest in the joint venture. The medium, highsulfur crude oil processed by the refinery is sourced mostly from the Middle East.

The refinery produces a full range of refined petroleum products and capitalizes on hydrocracking and coking technology to upgrade low-cost feedstocks to higher-margin products.

1 Reflects Phillips 66’s 47 percent share.
2 Crude capacity 80 MBD as of Jan. 1, 2012.

Central United States Refining as of Dec. 31, 2011   

The Billings Refinery is located in Billings, Mont. It processes a mixture of Canadian heavy, highsulfur crude oil plus domestic high-sulfur and low-sulfur crude oil, all delivered by pipelines. Its facilities include fluid catalytic cracking and hydrodesulfurization units.

A delayed coker converts heavy, high-sulfur residue into higher-value light oils. The refinery processes a high percentage of transportation fuels, such as gasoline, diesel and aviation fuel, as well as fuel-grade petroleum coke. Finished petroleum products from the refinery are delivered via pipeline, railcar and truck. Pipelines transport most of the refined products to markets in Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Utah and Washington.

The Ponca City Refinery is located in Ponca City, Okla., and processes a mixture of light, medium and heavy crude oil. Most of the crude oil processed is received by pipeline from Oklahoma, Texas and Canada.

The Ponca City Refinery is a high-conversion facility that produces a full range of products, including gasoline, diesel fuel, jet fuel, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and anode-grade petroleum coke. Its facilities include two fluid catalytic cracking units, alkylation, delayed coking and hydrodesulfurization units. Finished petroleum products are shipped by truck, railcar, and company-owned and common-carrier pipelines to markets throughout the Midcontinent region.

The Borger Refinery is located in Borger, Texas, in the Texas Panhandle about 50 miles north of Amarillo, and includes an NGL fractionation facility, with NGL fractionation gross capacity of 45 MBD. The refinery facilities include fluid catalytic cracking, alkylation, coking, hydrodesulfurization and naphtha reforming that enable it to produce a high percentage of transportation fuels. As a result of the business venture with Cenovus Energy, Phillips 66 has a 50 percent interest in the refinery, which it operates.

The refinery processes primarily medium sour crude oil and NGL delivered through pipelines from West Texas, the Texas Panhandle, Wyoming and Canada. The Borger Refinery also can receive foreign crude oil via company-owned and common-carrier pipeline systems. It produces a high percentage of transportation fuels, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel, as well as petroleum coke, NGL and solvents. Pipelines move refined products to West Texas, New Mexico, Colorado and the Midcontinent region.

1 Represents Phillips 66’s 50 percent share.

The Wood River Refinery is located about 15 miles northeast of St. Louis, Mo., in Roxana, Ill. Jointly owned by Phillips 66 and Cenovus Energy, the Wood River Refinery is operated by Phillips 66. The complex includes a docking area on the Mississippi River. The refinery processes a mix of light, low-sulfur and heavy, high-sulfur crude oil. Wood River receives domestic, Canadian and other foreign crude oil by various pipelines and produces a high percentage of transportation fuels, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. Other products include petrochemical feedstocks, asphalt and coke. Operations include two fluid catalytic cracking units, alkylation, hydrocracking, coking, reforming, hydrotreating and sulfur recovery. Wood River is a major supplier to Lambert International Airport in St. Louis and is also a supplier to Chicago O’Hare Airport. Finished product leaves Wood River through pipeline and by rail, barge and truck.

In 2011, the refinery completed the CORE project, which increased clean product yield by 5 percent. Gross heavy crude oil capacity is expected to increase between 90,000 to 110,000 barrels per day, dependent on the quality of available heavy Canadian crudes. The majority of the existing asphalt production at Wood River will be replaced with production of upgraded products.

1 Based on crude capacity of 153 MBD as of Dec. 31, 2011.

Gulf Coast United States Refining as of Dec. 31, 2011   

The Alliance Refinery, located on the Mississippi River in Belle Chasse, La., 25 miles south of New Orleans, processes mainly light, low-sulfur crude oil. Alliance receives domestic crude oil from the Gulf of Mexico via pipeline and foreign crude oil from West Africa via pipeline connected to the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port.

The single-train refinery’s facilities include fluid catalytic cracking, alkylation, coking, hydrodesulfurization units, a reformer and aromatics units that enable it to produce a high percentage of transportation fuels, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. Other products include petrochemical feedstocks, home heating oil and anode-grade petroleum coke. The majority of the refined products are distributed to customers in the southeastern and eastern United States through major common-carrier pipeline systems and by barge.

The Lake Charles Refinery, located in Westlake, La., primarily processes heavy, high-sulfur crude oil, as well as low-sulfur and acidic crude oil. The refinery receives domestic Gulf Coast and foreign crude oil.

The Lake Charles Refinery produces a high percentage of transportation fuels, such as gasoline and jet fuel, along with home heating oil. The majority of its refined products are distributed by truck, railcar, barge or major common-carrier pipelines in the southeastern and eastern United States. In addition, refined products can be sold into export markets through the refinery’s marine terminal.

The facilities include crude distillation, fluid catalytic cracker, alkylation, hydrocracker, delayed coker and hydrodesulfurization units that enable it to produce low-sulfur gasoline and heating oil. The refinery facilities also include a specialty coker and calciner, which produce graphite petroleum coke for the steel industry. Through the Excel Paralubes joint venture, the refinery produces base oils for lubricants.

Visit the Lake Charles Refinery web site here.

The Sweeny Refinery, located in Old Ocean, Texas, 65 miles southwest of Houston, processes mainly heavy, high-sulfur crude oil, but also processes light, low-sulfur crude oil. The refinery facilities include fluid catalytic cracking, delayed coking, alkylation, a continuous regeneration reformer and hydrodesulfurization units.

The refinery receives domestic and foreign crude oil, primarily through wholly- and jointly-owned terminals on the Gulf Coast, including a deepwater terminal at Freeport, Texas. It produces a high percentage of transportation fuels, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. Other products include petrochemical feedstocks, home heating oil and coke. The refinery operates nearby terminals and storage facilities in Freeport, Jones Creek and on the San Bernard River, along with pipelines that connect these facilities to the refinery. Refined products are distributed throughout the Midwest and southeastern United States by pipeline, barge and railcar.

Merey Sweeny, L.P. (MSLP) is a limited partnership that owns a 70 MBD delayed coker and related facilities at the Sweeny Refinery that produce fuel-grade petroleum coke. Prior to August 2009, MSLP was owned 50/50 by ConocoPhillips and Petróleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PDVSA), Venezuela’s national oil company. Under agreements that govern relationships between the partners, certain defaults by PDVSA with respect to supply of crude oil to the Sweeny Refinery gave ConocoPhillips the right to acquire PDVSA’s 50 percent ownership interest in MSLP. In August 2009, ConocoPhillips exercised that right. PDVSA has initiated arbitration in the International Chamber of Commerce challenging ConocoPhillips’ actions. Hearings are scheduled for December 2012, and the arbitration process is under way. Upon completion of the company’s repositioning, Phillips 66 now holds the interest in MSLP.


Eastern United States and Europe Refining as of Dec. 31, 2011   

The Bayway Refinery, located on New York Harbor in Linden, N.J., processes mainly light, low-sulfur crude oil. Crude oil is supplied to the refinery by tanker, primarily from the North Sea, Canada and West Africa. Bayway refining units include one of the world’s largest fluid catalytic cracking units, two hydrodesulfurization units, a reformer, an alkylation unit and other processing equipment.

The refinery produces a high percentage of transportation fuels, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel, as well as petrochemical feedstocks, residual fuel oil and home heating oil. The facility distributes refined products to East Coast customers via barges, trucks, pipelines and railcars. Bayway also has a 775 MMLB/Y polypropylene plant.

Visit the Bayway Refinery web site here

The Whitegate Refinery is located in Cork, Ireland. Whitegate is Ireland’s only refinery. Crude oil processed by the refinery is light, low-sulfur crude oil sourced mostly from the North Sea, North Africa and West Africa.

Refined products are distributed mostly inland, with some exported to international markets. Phillips 66 also operates a crude oil and products terminal with 7.5 million barrels of storage facilitated by an offshore mooring buoy in Bantry Bay, Cork, Ireland.

The Humber Refinery is located in North Lincolnshire, United Kingdom. Crude oil processed at the refinery is supplied primarily from the North Sea and includes light-, lowand medium-sulfur and acidic crude oils.

Humber is one of the most sophisticated refineries in Europe, a fully integrated facility that produces a high proportion of transportation fuels, such as gasoline and diesel fuel. Humber’s fluid catalytic cracking unit/thermal cracking/ coking configuration means that substantial volumes of other feedstocks, such as low-sulfur fuel oil and vacuum gas oil, are processed alongside crude oil to fully utilize Humber’s cracking capability.

The refinery also has two coking units with associated calcining plants that upgrade the heavy bottoms and imported feedstocks into light oil products and high-value graphite and anode-grade petroleum coke. Humber, the only coking refinery in the United Kingdom, is the world’s largest producer of specialty graphite cokes and Europe’s largest anode-grade coke producer. Approximately 60 percent of the light oils produced in the refinery are marketed in the United Kingdom, while the other products are exported to the rest of Europe, West Africa and the United States.

The Mineraloelraffinerie Oberrhein GmbH (MiRO) Refinery, located on the Rhine River in Karlsruhe in southwest Germany, is a joint venture refinery with Phillips 66 holding an 18.75 percent interest, the other owners being Shell, ExxonMobil and Ruhr Oel GmbH.

Phillips 66 processes mainly medium sweet and medium sour crude oil in its share of the refinery, sourced from Russia, North Africa, the Caspian Sea and the Middle East, and delivered to the refinery via two cross-country pipelines from ports at Trieste in Italy and Lavera in France.

The facilities at the high-conversion refinery include three crude unit trains, fluid catalytic cracking, petroleum coking and calcining, hydrodesulfurization units, reformers, isomerization and aromatics recovery units, ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), and alkylation units that enable it to produce a high percentage of transportation fuels, such as gasoline and diesel fuel. Other products include petrochemical feedstocks, home heating oil, bitumen, and anode- and fuel-grade petroleum coke.

Phillips 66 distributes the majority of its share of the refined products to customers in southwest Germany, northern Switzerland and western Austria by truck, railcar, barge and pipeline.

1 Reflects Phillips 66’s 18.75 percent share.